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Old 2019-05-12, 06:31 PM   #121
elpuebloUNIdo
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I want to add something to my last post. At some point I had to do exactly as finnspin did and remove a foot while riding forward. I noticed, however, that this method was much more successful after I learned the transitional method. I seemed to know when to remove the foot, instead of just guessing.
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Old 2019-05-12, 11:42 PM   #122
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Maybe Sigmund was too embarrassed to tell us!
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Old 2019-05-15, 01:59 PM   #123
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Originally Posted by elpuebloUNIdo View Post
I want to add something to my last post. At some point I had to do exactly as finnspin did and remove a foot while riding forward. I noticed, however, that this method was much more successful after I learned the transitional method. I seemed to know when to remove the foot, instead of just guessing.
I think it's actually easier (as always, I'm generalizing for most people) to learn how to ride one footed starting with one foot idling. You just stop when your foot is forward, and let yourself "fall forward" a little bit, then push down hard on the pedal. Once you figure out how to get through one rev, you'll get to continous riding relatively quickly.
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Old 2019-05-15, 06:17 PM   #124
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Thanks!

Thanks for this GREAT thread. I just read every post, and I learned a lot from so many wise, kind people. Iím going through a lot of the same stuff Garp went through, except heís way more awesomely dedicated than I am, and way more skilled. I just go out every night at 11:00 after the family goes to sleep, and flail around on the empty street under a street light for half an hour. Itís hard, sweaty work, but I frequently notice that Iím smiling broadly.

I am 58 and I have been working at unicycling for about 100 hours. Last weekend, I went to a track and was able to ride nonstop for 3 miles (until my rear got incredibly sore). I can free mount a lot of the timeóevery time at the end of a practice session, much lower percentage at the beginning. Iím working on making tighter and tighter, and slower and slower, u-turns both ways.

After coming into the house too many times and scaring my wife with blood all over my knees, elbows, and hands, I always wear cushy pads on all of those now. Maybe Iím just clumsy, but I fall flat on the pavement a couple times a week. As Iím falling onto the asphalt, I have this happy feeling that Iíve got the pads on.

Would hopping be the next skill? From reading this thread, idling and going backwards sound way too hard.
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Old 2019-05-15, 06:42 PM   #125
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Originally Posted by Atlantan View Post
Would hopping be the next skill? From reading this thread, idling and going backwards sound way too hard.
Hopping is probably the easiest. Idling is hard for some, and very easy for others, I'd give it a try at least. Riding backwards is probably the hardest by far.

All three skills you mentioned are what I'd consider "seperate". You can learn any of them individually, and aside from the general improvement to balance and feeling safe on a unicycle, they don't benefit each other much in my experience.
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Old 2019-05-16, 12:05 AM   #126
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Originally Posted by Atlantan View Post
Would hopping be the next skill? From reading this thread, idling and going backwards sound way too hard.
Idling and riding backwards are "way too hard" in the same way learning to ride in the first place was way too hard. But you succeeded anyway! Something to consider.

Regarding hopping:

I suggest learning how to ride with one hand on the grab handle before practicing hopping. Some riders on the forum have mentioned hopping with both hands in the air, but something about that offends my sensibilities.

A good transitional skill for hopping is the ability to ride forward, come to a momentary stop, then continue riding forward. The momentary still stand is the place where the hop(s) will eventually go.

Once you are able to do hops, even small ones, check the tightness of all the parts of your unicycle. You may be putting unprecedented force on the unicycle. If something is going to get loose, it may happen when you start hopping.

Don't worry about the size of your hops. Keep them small while you're learning. Focus on timing and the ease of hopping.

Congratulations on your progression into the "burning crotch" stage!
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Old 2019-05-18, 07:55 AM   #127
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200 hours

And another round number
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Old 2019-05-19, 04:14 PM   #128
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And another round number
wait for 666 for perfection
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Old 2019-05-19, 07:51 PM   #129
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wait for 666 for perfection
That's dark.
1000 will be a number to celebrate though. If I'm still counting my hours by then.
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Old 2019-05-19, 08:26 PM   #130
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seat a little lower, big difference

Before today's practice I lowered my seat by one inch so that when mounting my head - and everything from the hips up - would stay level.
I was expecting a change but not of that importance.

So far I like it, though I couldn't say that it's objectively better, more like a trade off.
On one hand, I have a greater control over the wheel, allowing me to recuperate from situations that would have had me step down before. On the other, balancing is just a little harder, kind of like balancing a stick on a finger and then changing to a slightly shorter stick.

Anyway, my point here is that lowering the seat by just one inch made a difference whose magnitude surprised me.
This was on a 20er, btw, and from an already quite low position. Not sure how this translates to other sizes.

Last edited by Garp; 2019-05-19 at 08:28 PM.
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Old 2019-05-19, 11:38 PM   #131
elpuebloUNIdo
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Originally Posted by Garp View Post
Anyway, my point here is that lowering the seat by just one inch made a difference whose magnitude surprised me.
This was on a 20er, btw, and from an already quite low position. Not sure how this translates to other sizes.
When I learned how to perform a proper static mount, the first pedal moved from 6:00 all the way up past 9:00, allowing me to mount onto a higher saddle.

At this point in your learning, however, garp, lowering the seat will help you mount with the first foot at the 6:00 position. While this mount is not ideal...because you start out in a weak position to pedal out of...it may be safer and more effective in the short run, because the second pedal will stay at the 12:00 position. Some of my most awkward falls as a beginner happened when my second foot missed the second pedal because it moved during the mount.
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Old 2019-05-20, 12:06 AM   #132
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Originally Posted by elpuebloUNIdo View Post
At this point in your learning, however, garp, lowering the seat will help you mount with the first foot at the 6:00 position. While this mount is not ideal...because you start out in a weak position to pedal out of...it may be safer and more effective in the short run, because the second pedal will stay at the 12:00 position.
I've been able to static mount (with the cranks horizontal) for about two months now, so that wasn't the motivation. Though the lower seat position has made the mount even more straight forward: now it's not just the wheel that's static, I only have to move the second foot while everything else stays put.

Quote:
Originally Posted by elpuebloUNIdo View Post
Some of my most awkward falls as a beginner happened when my second foot missed the second pedal because it moved during the mount.
I remember those.
Not too many falls but lots of shin bites!
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Old 2019-05-20, 04:12 AM   #133
elpuebloUNIdo
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Originally Posted by Garp View Post
Not sure how this translates to other sizes.
My understanding is: At a certain larger wheel diameter for a certain height rider, static mounts are going to be no longer possible/easy. Other techniques, such as jumps, forward momentum, etc., will have to be used.

I ride with a pretty high seat. My static mount is unconventional. I place weight on the saddle both by sitting on its back edge and by pressing down hard with both hands on the front saddle grab handle or bar ends. This allows me to lean forward, getting my center of gravity more over the hub. I would struggle to do a static mount with my current seat height if my arms were in the air during the mount.
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Old 2019-05-23, 03:06 AM   #134
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Impact Athmos saddle

So, my seat snapped. Right at the back of the seat post's plate.
Thankfully, this didn't come as a surprise and I had already bought a replacement: an Impact Athmos.

What I didn't notice when I got it is how thin the padding is (compared to the one on the original seat).
Now it feels like I'm sitting on a piece of wood. I won't be riding any distance any time soon.

Anyone knows this saddle? Should I expect to grow calluses on my butt?
Or maybe eat more junk food to add some natural padding?
I mean, is this something one gets used to over time?
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Old 2019-05-23, 03:23 AM   #135
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Originally Posted by Garp View Post
So, my seat snapped. Right at the back of the seat post's plate.
Thankfully, this didn't come as a surprise and I had already bought a replacement: an Impact Athmos.

What I didn't notice when I got it is how thin the padding is (compared to the one on the original seat).
Now it feels like I'm sitting on a piece of wood. I won't be riding any distance any time soon.

Anyone knows this saddle? Should I expect to grow calluses on my butt?
Or maybe eat more junk food to add some natural padding?
I mean, is this something one gets used to over time?
I think if you are sitting mostly on your sit bones that you will get used it and toughen up over time. If you are putting pressure on more sensitive parts you may have to adjust your saddle to put more load on your sit bones. More sensitive parts will not toughen up over time.
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